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Past Research Projects

Below are some of the previous research projects conducted by the Gray Wolf Research Group and collaborators. 

Sunset in Alaska

Alaska wolves

We are finishing up a project looking at wolf genetics in two protected areas in Alaska; Denali National Park and Yukon-Charley River National Preserve. We are extracting DNA from tissue samples collected during capture and radiocollar operations over 30 years to assess genetic diversity and connectivity in the two areas. This work was done in collaboration with Drs. Jen Adams, Bridget Borg, Mat Sorum, and Lisette Waits.

 

Partner(s): U.S. National Park Service, U.S. Geological Survey

Mexican Wolf Pups

Mexican WoLVES 

Despite our website name, Mexican wolves are not gray wolves. Mexican wolves are an endangered wolf that was reintroduced to their former range in the desert southwest of the US and Mexico. We are finishing up work that is using habitat models to try and predict suitable pup-rearing habitat for Mexican wolves. The resulting models will help biologist target survey efforts and be more efficient in the field. This project is in collaboration with Drs. Sarah Bassing and John Oakleaf. 

 

Partner(s): U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Arizona Game and Fish, New Mexico Game and Fish

Alberta Wolf Crew

ALBERTA WOLVES

We conducted research on wolves on the eastern front in Alberta from 2010-2014. We tested population monitoring techniques that could provide a population estimate without the need for capture and radiocollaring. This work was done in collaboration with Drs. Mike Mitchell, Lisette Waits, and Sarah Bassing.

 

Partners: Alberta Environmental Resources and Sustainable Development, Parks Canada, Alberta Provincial Parks, Waterton Biosphere Reserve Association

Yellowstone National Park Wolf Crew

Yellowstone National Park wolves

From 2012-2014, we conducted research in Yellowstone as part of a study to look at the potential effects of hunting and trapping on gray wolves. Yellowstone was used as a “control” study area, where there was little to no harvest of our study packs. This work was done in collaboration with Drs. Mike Mitchell, Lisette Waits, Dan Stahler and Doug Smith.

Partners: U.S. National Park Service

Wolf tracks in Montana

Montana Wolves

We conducted research on wolves in Montana to test population monitoring techniques that could provide a population estimate without the need for capture and radiocollaring. Methods tested included howlboxes, rub stations, occupancy modeling. This work was done in collaboration with Drs. Mike Mitchell, Lindsey Rich, and Sarah Sells.

 

Partners: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. National Park Service, Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks

Wolves in Idaho

Oregon Wolves

Brief description of the project: When is started, duration and main goal of research.

Partners include Waterton Biosphere Reserve Association and Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development

Find out more about our research

You can learn more about the research we've conducted through our publications. 

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